R2Net Guide

About this Guide

The Logictran RTF Converter is a package that converts word processing documents to HTML and XML. This guide covers the basic conversion options. More detailed treatment on customizing your output can be found in The Customization Reference Manual. The online version of this guide will always contain the most up-to-date documentation as well as information about available upgrades.
The converter can be run as an application complete with a graphical user interface (Windows, Macintosh), or a command line interface (Unix, Windows.) It is also available as a library (Unix), DLL and ActiveX component.

Licensing

The Logictran RTF Converter is available for downloading at http://www.logictran.com/latest.html. You can order the converter online at: http://www.logictran.com/order.html or request a 30 day demo key http://www.logictran.com/cgi-local/demokey.cgi?platform=Windows&edition=r2netdev .

Upgrading from version 4.x

Users of version 4.x of the converter should find that their existing translation files will work with version 5.0. To get maximum benefit from the new release, you should examine the changes that you made to version 4. translation files and re-apply those changes to version 5.0. The settings files have been re-organized and re-named in version 5.0, so please see the What's New in 5.0 section of the Customization Reference Manual.

Options

The Logictran RTF Converter allows you to select the layout of your HTML or XML output without having to edit each document. There are options for changing backgrounds, text and link colors, headers and footers and much more – all of which can be selected at the time you convert your document. This section describes all of the options which can be turned on or off from the command line, or from within the Graphical User Interface. Some of these options have command line shortcuts which are documented in r2netcmd.html. The shortcuts are provided for brevity on the command line and are a small subset of the customization options available through the translation files. To set any of the strings described in the following sections, use the -Dname=value notation on the command line.
In addition to these options, the converter also allows control over every aspect of the conversion, including character set translation and definitions of all of the HTML or XML markup. To find out more about detailed customizations, see the Customization Reference Manual.
There are three ways to set options:
  1. If you are using a Graphical User Interface, some of the most commonly used features have menu selections or check-boxes. These options are described in the application guides see:(Windows, Macintosh).
  2. Any version of the converter will use translation options defined in file 'trnflag.trn' (you will find this file in the same folder as the converter application.) trnflag.trn looks like this:
    .Strings
    stringname,'value'
    stringname2,'value'
You set translation options by adding new stringname and value pairs. The names and values to use will be given in the next section. If the value you need to set contains quotes or multiple lines, see the discussion of String Syntax.
For example, if we want to set the background image for our HTML document, and make the default text color green, we would modify trnflag.trn to contain these lines:
.Strings
background,'http://www.me.com/images/wow.jpg'
TxtColor,'green'

  1. Command line versions of the converter can also accept options defined on the command line with the –D option. The syntax for this is:
    r2netcmd –Dstringname='value' –Dstringname2='value'
If the value you need to set contains quotes, characters special to your shell or multiple lines, consider using the trnflag.trn mechanism described above. Also see the discussion of String Syntax.
For example, if we want to set the background image for our HTML document, and make the default text color green, we would run the converter with the options:
r2netcmd –DTxtColor='green' –Dbackground='http://www.me.com/images/wow.jpg' file.rtf

In the rest of the sections, default values are listed first.

Document Type Options

String
Default Value
Description
TrnFile
html.trn
Specifies the translation file to use.
'html.trn' is used for HTML or XHTML output. Setting this to 'docbook.trn' specifies output matching the Docbook DTD.
XHTML
0
If set to '1' the output type will be XHTML.
DTDPublic
-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN
The 'official' public identifier for the XHTML DTD
DTDSystem
xhtml1-transitional.dtd
The location to find the DTD on your system (or web site.) If you are using XML tools, download the DTD, and entity definitions( xhtml-lat1.ent, xhtml-special.ent, xhtml-symbol.ent) to your system and put them in the same folder as your document. Alternatively, you can adjust this string to provide a URL that the DTD can be located at.

HTML

HTML is the default output for the filter. The HTML document type has two variations HTML version 3 and HTML version 4. The converter will choose version 4 of HTML by default, which is supported by all current browsers. The only change between these two versions is the handling of tables.

XHTML

XHTML is a variation of HTML that is both valid HTML and valid XML at the same time. Because it is valid HTML it will display in exiting browsers. Because it is valid XML, it can be manipulated and used in tools designed for XML. When you generate XHTML you can select either .html, .htm, or .xml as a file extension. Choosing a .xml file extension will cause Internet Explorer version 5.0 to process the document as an XML document and it will check the document for well-formedness. This will also require the DTD to be available to the browser. The system and public location for the DTD can be specified as well.

Docbook

Docbook is a document type that is often used for large documents. It supports indexes, table of contents, preface, appendices – in short, almost any document component that you may need.

Other XML DTD's

You can define your own document type. To do this, you may want to use docbook.trn as an example. You will need to define the markup, and how to map from the paragraph and character styles in your document to the markup in your DTD.

Frames Options

String
Default Value
Description
GenFrames
0
If set to '1', The document will be converted into a framed document, with the table of contents and index in the right hand frame, and the body of the document in the right frame.
FrameLeftSize
30%
Sets the width of the left frame.
FrameRightSize
*
Sets the width of the right frame.

GalleyView Options

String
Default Value
Description
Galleyview
0
If this is set to 1, the contents of the title page will be inserted into the lower right cell of a table. The contents of the other cells are constant strings.
GVCol1Width
120
The width of the leftmost column (the galley)
GVCol2Width
11
The width of the middle column (this has no content and is just used for spacing.)
GVCol3Width
*
The width of the rightmost column (contains the content of you document)
GVTLValign
top
Cell alignment of the top left cell in the galley (alternate values are 'middle', 'bottom', 'baseline')
GVTRValign
top
Cell alignment of the top right cell in the galley
GVGValign
top
Cell alignment of the galley cell
GVBValign
top
Cell alignment for the cell containing your document content
GVTopLeft

Content of the top left corner of the galleyview table
GVTopRight

Content of the top right corner of the galleyview table
GVGalley
$GenTOC(FALSE)
Content of the galley cell. By default this is the table of contents for the entire document. (Setting MaxTOCLevel to '1' or '2' is recommended with this use of the table of contents.)

Navigation Panels

String
Default Value
Description
SkipNavPanel
1
If set to '0' navigation panels will be generated at the top and bottom of each page. Navigation panels provide links to the table of contents and index files. If file splitting is enabled, you will also get links to the title page, next page, previous page and up (moving upwards in the document hierarchy.)
Imagedir
.../doc/images/
This is the path to where the navigation button images are stored. The default location is useful for viewing converted documents on your local machine, but it should be changed to a complete URL prior to uploading the documents to your web site.
TextNav
0
If set to '1' navigation panels will be generated with text instead of buttons. By default navigation panels are generated with images stored in the directory pointed to by $Imagedir, and having the names 'prev.gif', 'next.gif', 'up.gif', 'first.gif', 'contents.gif', 'index.gif'.
NavHeadings
0
If set to '1' will use actual headings instead of the words 'next', 'previous' and 'up'

The Document Title

String
Value
Description
Title

The title of your document. If not set, the title will be taken from the RTF document properties Title. If that is not set, the first heading will be used. If that is not set, the filename will be used.
DefTitle

Setting this will specify a default title to use instead of the first heading or filename, when the RTF document title property is not set.


Background Options

String
Default Value
Description
Background

URL of the background image
BColor

Either a color name, or RGB value for the background color (in the form #RRGGBB).

Headers and Footers

String
Default Value
Description
includeHeaders
0
If set to 1 HTML/XHTML/OEB output files will include the page header.
includeFooters
0
If set to 1 HTML/XHTML/OEB output files will include the page footer.

File Splitting, Table of Contents and Indexes

String
Default Value
Description
SplitDepth
0
Setting this to a value from '1' to '6' will cause your RTF document to be split at that corresponding heading level. For example, with a SplitDepth of '2', “Heading 1” and “Heading 2” paragraphs will start new HTML files. Splitting large documents will improve download times and reduce memory requirements for browsers. See The Customization Reference Manual. for details of using End Paragraph (EndPar) processing to allow splitting of files at any paragraph.
GenContents
0
If set to '1', an external table of contents will be generated. The table of contents will show the hierarchy of all headings in the document, and provide hypertext links from the table of contents to the corresponding headings.
GenFigureList
0
If set to ‘1’, a list of figures will be created in the string FigureList and output as part of the external table of contents.
GenTableList
0
If set to ‘1’, a list of tables will be created in the string TableList and output as part of the external table of contents.
SkipTrailingToc
1
If set to '0' a table of contents will be generated at the start of each file. The table of contents will show the hierarchy of all headings included within the current document, and provide hypertext links from the table of contents to the corresponding headings.
SkipLeadingToc
1
If set to '0' a table of contents will be generated at the end of each file. The table of contents will show the hierarchy of all headings included within the current document, and provide hypertext links from the table of contents to the corresponding headings.
SkipLeadingToc
1
If set to '0' a table of contents will be generated at the end of each file. The table of contents will show the hierarchy of all headings included within the current document, and provide hypertext links from the table of contents to the corresponding headings.
GenBreadCrumbs
0
Generate a breadcrumbs trail at the top of each page. This is useful when splitdepth > 0, to show the heading hierarchy that got us to this file. Eg > heading1 title > heading 2 title > this title. The titles above the current page are href’s to the pages containing the titles.
MaxTOCLevel
99
The highest heading level that will be included in a table of contents. Setting this to a lower value will reduce the depth of your table of contents.
StripHeadNo
1
If set to'1', heading numbering will be stripped prior to generating a table of contents
GenIndex
1
If set to 1, an external index will be generated from any index entries found. If no entries are found this is ignored


Text Options

String
Default Value
Description
TxtColor

Either a color name, or RGB value for the default text color.
AColor

Either a color name, or RGB value for the color of an active link.
LColor

Either a color name, or RGB value for the color of an unvisited link.
VColor

Either a color name, or RGB value for the color of a visited link.
FontScale
.33
Scaling applied to all font sizes. Increase this to enlarge all of your fonts.

File Naming

String
Value
Description
OutFileName
the input file name with the extension specified by HtmlExt in place of .RTF
The output file name controls the name of the file and what directory it is place in. By default the output files are placed in the same directory as the input file.
HtmlExt
html
The filename extension. The default for short (DOS) filenames is 'htm'. When generating XML content, this should be set to 'xml'
ShortNames
0
If set to '1' output filenames will be limited to 8 characters with a 3 letter extension.
ShortFileDigits
2
Sets the number of digits used in numbering images. If your document contains more than 99 images, set this to '3'.
ISuffix
-Index
Appended to the output filename to produce the Index file name. The default for short (DOS) filenames is '_i'
CSuffix
-Contents
Appended to the output filename to produce the Contents file name. The default for short (DOS) filenames is '_c'
FCSuffix
-FContents
Appended to the output filename to produce the Framed Contents file name. The default for short (DOS) filenames is "fc".
FISuffix
-FIndex
Appended to the output filename to produce the Framed Index file name. The default for short (DOS) filenames is "fi".
TSuffix
-Title
Appended to the output filename to produce the Title file name. The default for short (DOS) filenames is '_t'
CFname
$OutFileName;-Contents
Override the Contents file name.
FCFname
$OutFileName;-FContents
Override the Framed Contents file name
IFname
$OutFileName;-Index
Override the Index file name
FIFname
$OutFileName;-FIndex
Override the Framed Index file name
TFname
$OutFileName;-Title
Override the Title file name
Note. See CustomRef.html under functions GenFilename and GenImageFilename for details of how to change the file names associated with split files (ie when splitdepth > 1)

Tables

String
Value
Description
AllBorders
0
If set, generates borders on all tables
FullWidthTables
0
If set, tables are generated that expand to the maximum size of the browser window. Column widths are scaled relative to their original widths.
TableScale
1.3333
A scaling factor for sizing table and column widths. To increase the widths of all your tables, increase this number.
This is ignored if FullWidthTables is set.
AutoTableWidth
0
If set, tables are generated without any widths – and columns are sized by the browser to accommodate their contents.
_empty_cell_tag_
'<br>'
The value inserted into an empty table cell. Netscape Navigator used to render empty cells poorly without a break being inserted.

Graphics

String
Value
Description
NoGraphics
0
If set to 1, no graphic image files will be written. (Links for the images will still be inserted.)
InlineGraphics
1
Setting this to 0 will generate external references to all images in the document. The text "[Image]" will appear instead of the image.
KeepDupPicts
0
By default, an image that is used several times in a document will be stored once as an external file, and referenced multiple times. Setting this to 1 will create a external file for each time an image is referenced.
ImageSize
scale
For images that were scaled in the RTF document, the height and width attributes on the img tag will be scaled to match. Setting this to 'noscale' will produce height and width attributes that match the original image size (this produces more legible images – as some browsers do not scale images well.) Setting this to 'off' eliminates the height and width attributes (this increases rendering time for browsers because they cannot do page layout until all images are downloaded).
MacAdjust
100
Scaling factor for Mac PICT images. This only affects the height and width attributes on the img tag. Increasing this number will result in larger images.
WMFAdjust
133.3333
Scaling factor for Windows Meta File images. This only affects the height and width attributes on the img tag. Increasing this number will result in larger images.
BMPAdjust
2000
Scaling factor for Windows Bitmap images. This only affects the height and width attributes on the img tag. Increasing this number will result in larger images.
KeepOriginalImages
0
WMF, BMP and PICT images are automatically converted to JPEG format when they are encountered in an RTF document. Setting this to '1' will leave a copy of the image in it's original format along with the converted image.
SkipEMF
0 – on Windows Platforms 
1 – on other platforms
Enhanced Windows MetaFiles (EMF) images may occur in some RTF documents. These are not converted by ImageMagick or GraphicConverter, so setting this to 1 selects the WMF version of these graphics instead.
SkipPNG
0
PNG images may appear in the RTF. If so, they are by default used as the image files rather than creating the image type as determined by ImageExt. Setting SkipPNG to ‘1’ will ignore these PNG files and convert the matching WMF’s to the ImageExt filetype.
SkipJPG
0
JPG images may appear in the RTF. If so, they are by default used as the image files rather than creating the image type as determined by ImageExt. Setting SkipJPG to ‘1’ will ignore these PNG files and convert the matching WMF’s to the ImageExt filetype.
WriteImagesToFile
0
Only affects String to String conversions, using the DLL/ActiveX/ASP or Linux library interfaces. When converting an RTF string, setting this string to ‘1’ will force all images to be written to files rather than being returned as part of the HTML string output. This allows the image conversion to take place – returning, for example, a JPG rather than a WMF – and also removes potential issues of dealing with binary image data in string variables. See GenImageFilename in CustomRef.html for details on changing where the images are written to disk.

Miscellaneous Options

String
Value
Description
StrictHeaders
0
Setting this to '1' will eliminate text markup (like bold, italic, font) from 'h1' to 'h6' paragraphs.
base

Can be set to '<base href="...">' where the href attribute can be set to the documents eventual location.
truepar
0
Setting this to '1' will generate '<p>' tags in place of '<div>' tags. This usually results in more whitespace between paragraphs when rendered in a browser.
charset
iso-8859-1
The charset attribute generated for the document.
nofont
0
Setting this to '1' will eliminate '<font...>' markup (thereby losing font size, color and face information.)
OnlyBody
0
Setting this to '1' will eliminate <html>...<body> markup, so that the HTML output can begin with real content. Useful if you will imbed the resulting HTML in another document through post-processing.
legacy
0
If set to '1' will convert RTF documents prepared for the converter version 1 and version 2.
redlinks
0
If set to '1' red text will be treated as URL's or cross-references within the current document.
css
0
If set to '1', the HTML output will be generated using Cascading Style Sheets.
OldTags
0
If set to '1' and $css is also set to 1, you will get HTML formatting attributes (like align='center') in addition to style sheets. This is provided for supporting old (non-css) browsers.
inlineCSS
0
This controls the type of stylesheet entries that will be generated if $css is set to '1', (otherwise it is ignored.)

The default generation of stylesheets is to create a stylesheet entry for each unique combination of paragraph or text attributes. These entries will be named using the RTF style name when a style name is available. Otherwise a unique but random name will be used.

If $inlineCSS set to '1' you will get a stylesheet entry for each character and paragraph style. When the styles are referenced in the body of the HTML you will get style="..." attributes for any style attributes that are different from the base style.
GenCSSFile
0
If set to '1', the stylesheet will be created as an external file and linked into the HTML document. The external file name will be the output file name with a '.css' extension.
StyleSheet

This string is inserted in the 'head' section of the HTML document and will contain either an inline stylesheet, or a link the external stylesheet depending on the value of GenCSSFile. You may override this string if you want to use a common stylesheet across multiple HTML files. In this case, set CSS, GenCSSFile, and InlineCSS to '1'. Then set StyleSheet to:
'<LINK rel="STYLESHEET" href="..." type="text/css">' , where href points to your common stylesheet.
StyleCaseSensitive
0
If set to ‘1’ stylenames in .pmatch lookups will be treated as case sensitive. By default ‘abc’ matches ‘ABC’, etc. This is required if the input RTF distinguishes between styles only by case.

Features

Character Formatting Properties

The converter supports bold, italic, underline, strikethrough, superscript, subscript, color, font faces and font sizes. All monospaced fonts are mapped to <TT> that will use monospaced type even on older browsers that do not support fonts.

Paragraph Alignment and Margins

Paragraph alignment (center, left, right, fill) is supported within most contexts. The exceptions to this are Pre-Formatted Paragraphs and Headings, which are always left justified. Left and right margins are supported as well as hanging (first line) indents.

Tabs

Tabs are not supported as a formatting tool. Tables that are built using tabs should be converted to proper tables within your word processor. The exception to this is for pre-formatted lists.

Paragraph Styles

Each paragraph style in your document can be mapped to a different HTML markup. This is done by adding your styles to the PMatch table. This allows you to specify which pre-defined HTML paragraph and list styles should be used for all paragraphs using a particular style. You can also define your own HTML paragraph and list styles by adding entries to the .PTag table.

Images

Images in RTF files have two forms, you can embed the image in the document, or link to an external image file (with the option of also embedding a copy of the image). The converter can handle either of these forms. Each unique[1] embedded image in a document is written out to a separate file. The initial format of the image files depends on the word processor and platform that they were generated on. For example a Word document generated on a Windows platform will have WMF or BMP images, those generated on a Macintosh platform will contain PICT images. The converter will translate PICT, WMF and BMP images to JPEG format when it encounters them in a document. When the converter encounters a JPEG, GIF or PNG image within a document – it will save the image without reformatting it. Images that are scaled within the RTF document may or may not appear scaled in the resulting HTML depending on the ImageSize option. Cropping is never done on images.

An attempt is made to preserve the relative positioning of images within a document when the output file is viewed. For example, if the image is right justified and flowing with the surrounding text, it will remain so in the output. Due to limitations in what can (easily) be achieved in HTML, the relative positions can not be preserved exactly. For example, images centered in free flowing text will become left justified. The RTF fields that help determine image positioning are exposed as strings WrapStyle and WrapSide. These are details in html.trn, allowing for different image positioning to be applied as required.

Lists

Nested lists can be created from an RTF document by using a different style for each level of indentation. The styles "Bullet List 1" " Bullet List 2" ... represent different levels of nesting, with “Bullet list” being the outermost list. The only rule for use is that no levels of nesting are skipped. For example, a " Numbered list 3" paragraph must not appear immediately after a "Normal" paragraph. It must follow a paragraph with a nesting level of 2 or higher.

An example sequence of paragraph styles to produce a nested list might look like this:

Numbered List
	Bullet List 1
		Bullet List 2
		Glossary 2
	Bullet List 1
		Numbered List 2
The converter also recognizes lists that are automatically numbered (or bulleted) by your word processor. In this case, the filter converts the list to an <OL> or <UL> markup respectively. In this conversion, the numbers or bullets supplied by your word processor will be stripped off, and the HTML browser will supply its own. If you prefer to retain your word processors numbers (and how they are formatted) you can set KeepPN to 1.

The converter knows about the following list styles. :
DEF, TERM
These paragraph styles are used in pairs. The first paragraph is a term, the second paragraph is a definition. These pairs of paragraphs are converted to a definition list (<DL>) markup.
Glossary [n]
Will be converted to <DL> markup with all text up to the first tab being treated as the term (<DT>) The optional number [n] allows you to generate nested lists by using "Glossary 1" through "Glossary 5".
Small Gloss
Will be converted to a two column table (without borders). This should render as a more compact format than because terms and their definitions can fit on a single line.
Numbered List [n]
Will be converted to <OL> markup with all text up to the first tab or space being stripped off - this will let the HTML browser generate the list numbers. The optional number [n] allows you to generate nested lists by using " Numbered List 1" through " Numbered List 5".
Bullet List [n]
Will be converted to <UL> markup with all text up to the first tab or space being stripped off - this will let the HTML browser generate the bullets. The optional number [n] allows you to generate nested lists by using " Bullet List 1" through " Bullet List 5".

You can use your own paragraph style names by adding your names to the .Pmatch table.

Footnotes

Footnotes and endnotes are processed identically. They are consolidated at the end of the document, and linked to the reference by a hypertext link.

Headings

Headings are special kinds of paragraphs because they begin a chapter or section, and they give your document some structure. Headings are included in the table of contents, and they have a heading level associated with them (level 1 being the outermost section, level 6 being the innermost.) In MS Word, the outlining tool uses the style names "Heading 1" through "Heading 6" and these style are already known to the converter. If you use different styles for your headings, just add them to the PTag Table, so to the converter knows how to treat them. See Adding PMatch Entries

The converter can split long documents into smaller ones at the any heading level. If you chose to split at level 2 headings, then every level 1 heading or level 2 heading would start a new document.

Headings are included in Table of Contents generated by the converter..

Headings automatically generate a cross-reference so that you can link to them.

Cross-references

The converter supports a wide variety of cross-references.
  • HTML links produced by MS Word version 7 and above are automatically preserved as hyperlinks.
  • MS Word cross-references produced by MS Word version 7 and above are automatically preserved as hyperlinks.
  • All bookmarks in your document become anchors (locations that you can link to).
  • Any text with the character style " Anchor" becomes an anchor (location that you can link to).
  • Any text with the character style " HTMLRef" is processed as a link. First it is scanned to see if it matches any leading text of a heading in the current document. If it matches, it generates a link to that heading. If no match is found, and it contains a ":" - it treats the text as a hypertext link to an external document or email address.
  • A Table of Contents can be generated which produces a hypertext links between the table of contents and the corresponding headings.
  • An Index can be generated which produces a hypertext links between the index entries and their locations in the document.
  • At the top of any file, or at the bottom of any file, a local table of contents can be generated containing hypertext links to all headings within that file.
  • An explicit hypertext link can be created using a URL followed immediately by the "hot" text. The URL must be marked with the character style: "Href" and the "hot" text marked with the character style "Hot".

Index entries

If you insert index entries into your RTF-document the converter will generate an index for you with hypertext links between the index entries and the corresponding references in your document. You can disable generation of the index by setting GenIndex=0.

Fields

Fields are instructions inserted into your RTF file that provide features unique to a given word processor. For example, MS Word uses fields to insert symbols, provide links to external images, hypertext links, and cross-references. These four uses of fields are automatically supported by the converter.

Language Support

The converter generates English words and phrases within your converted documents to mark indexes, table of contents, next, last and title page. If your document was written in another language the converter will substitute the appropriate phrases for your language. Note that this feature requires that the word processor that created your RTF properly mark your document with the correct language. The phrases generated are stored in html.trn so that you can modify them to suit your tastes or to add additional languages.

The converter will also mark the header of your HTML document so that search engines can tell the language of the document.

Discarding Unwanted Text

If you have text that you do not want to appear in the HTML output, simply format the text as Hidden or use the character style " Discard".

Embedding HTML in a Document

Normally, if your RTF document contained the text "<cite>hello</cite>", the translator would output this as: "&lt;cite&gt;hello&lt;/cite&gt;". This ensures that the text would appear in your HTML output exactly as it appeared in the original RTF document. If, however, you want the <cite></cite> to be interpreted as HTML markup, you must format the text with the character style " Literal". The filter will then send the tags through without translation. It is also possible to use the paragraph style “HTML” to let the converter interpret a whole paragraph as being literal HTML.

When the converter produces HTML markup, it keeps track of the nesting level of tags to ensure that you don't get something like <b><cite>hello</b></cite> which would be incorrect markup. If you imbed HTML markup in your document, the filter will NOT be aware of it. You must ensure that your markup appears correctly nested.

Adding PMatch Entries

Everyone has their own paragraph style names that are defined and used in their environment. To get the most out of the RTF converter, you should add your style names to the translation files so that the converter generates the best markup for your documents. The converter will use the first entry that it finds in the PMatch table ('Normal') if it encounters a paragraph style that it does not recognize. For HTML translations this will give you either '<p>' or '<div>' markup depending on the setting of '$TruePars'. To add a paragraph style, you just edit the trnflag.trn file. Look first in the directory containing your RTF file, if you don't have one there – edit the one in the RTF converter application directory. At the end of the trnflag.trn file you will find:
.PMatch
# Put your Paragraph styles here.
# format is (without the leading #)
#'YourStyleName',0,'.Ptag_entry_name'
'Normal',0,'Normal' # 1st entry is the default - Normal works well for that

Add your paragraph styles (one per line) to the end if this file in the format:
"Paragraph Style",nesting_level,"PTagName"

Where:
Paragraph Style
Your paragraph style name. If your paragraph style names have commas in them, use everything up to but not including the comma as a style name.
nesting_level
This should be 0 except for nested paragraphs.
PTagName
The name of the .PTag entry that should be used for paragraphs with this paragraph style.

Examples:
'Normal',0,'Normal'
'heading 1',0,'h1'

The PTagName that you should use depends on the style of your paragraph. Pick the best match from the following table. You can add your own PTag styles as well, see PTag for details.
h1
A level 1 heading. Generates '<h1>' markup in HTML. Will be included in the table of contents.
h2..h6
Level 2..6 headings. Generates '<h2>' ...'<h6>' markup in HTML. Will be included in the table of contents
ul-d
A bullet list item. Generates '<ul>' markup in HTML. Any existing bullets will be stripped from the line so that the HTML browser can supply it's own.
dl
Produces a definition list. Used for paragraphs with a term followed by a tab followed by a definition. Can also be used where you have paragraph numbering like '2.4.3', to preserve your existing paragraph numbers.
address
Used for addresses. Generates '<address>' markup in HTML.
blockquote
Used for Blockquotes (usually rendered as italic). Generates '<blockquote>' markup in HTML.
pre
Used for pre-formatted text such as computer listings, or screen samples. This should be used anywhere you need a monospaced font and need to preserve spaces.
newgloss
An alternative to dl markup. Instead of using '<dl>' tags, you will get a table, with your terms (everything up to the first tab) in column 1 and the definition (everything else) in column 2.


[1] All of the embedded graphics are compared (using a checksum) to see if the same image is used several times in a document. If it is, the image will only be written once and the same image link will be used mutiple times. To force all graphics to be written, set KeepDupPicts to 1.


Last Update:02/25/2003


© Copyright 2003 Logictran, Inc. All rights reserved. - Privacy Statement